Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Book Review: The Tattered Quilt

Author: Wanda E. Brunstetter
Title: The Tattered Quilt
Publisher: Barbour Publishing
Publish Date: August 6, 2013
Buy: Amazon
Review Copy Provided By: Net Galley
Book Blurb: Join Emma Yoder Miller, the Amish widow-turned-newlywed, as she leads another quilting class with a new group of unlikely students, all with tattered pieces of their lives that need mending. Members of the patchwork group find friendship, faith, healing, and restoration while gathered around their quilts, under the Father’s guiding hands—for only He can take what’s ragged and shabby from the lives of His children and turn it into beauty for His glory.


Review: Even if you haven't read Half Stitched Amish Quilting Club, you can enjoy the sequel, The Tattered Quilt.

Emma is taking on  a new class of would be quilters and like the group from the first book, there is an eclectic mix  of people in the class, young, old, men, women, Amish and English.

What makes this book such fun to read is how it is told through all the classmates eyes. It reads like a Christian soap opera, if there were such a thing. There's romance between several characters, there are personal struggles and so much more.

This series isn't your typical Amish read and that's what makes it such fun. I love Emma and her husband Lamar. They really seem to pull the goodness out of everyone.

Several of the characters in this quilting class have a connection to the folks from the characters in the first book, but again that doesn't mean this book can't be read as a stand alone. I did, and I wasn't lost at all.

Probably the most fun characters are Cheryl, Terry and Blaine. There's a little bit of a love triangle going on here. Cheryl takes the class after bringing her grandmother's quilt to Emma for repairs. Terry and Blaine both want to date her for different reasons. Terry is a bit of a biker whereas Blaine is more clean cut.

Carmen is a journalist come to Indiana to see her brother-in-law and niece while trying to write an article on the Amish.

Anna is Amish girl, trying to break free of the chains her parents seem to have her caught up in.

Lastly is Selma, a cranky, lonely old lady that you can't help but love and feel sorry for.

I love how their lives intertwine as the novel progresses and the permanent connections that are made, as well as how the class really transforms each of them.

I look forward to reading about Emma's next quilting class.

Rating: 5 flowers




1 comments:

Mrs. Pedersen said...

Looks like a good read! :)

 
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